Unrest in Libya

This item appears on page 18 of the August 2014 issue.
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In Libya, at least 70 people were killed in clashes between the Libyan National Army and armed militias from late May through June.

After overthrowing Colonel Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, the Libyan government was unable to disarm the independent armed militias that had assisted them. Instead, militias were funded in the hopes they would be loyal to the government. These militia groups number up to 1,700 and operate with very little input from the government.

General Khalifa Haftar, a former army chief of staff under Muammar Gaddafi, has led the Libyan National Army in attacks against the government-funded militia known as the February 17th Brigade, associated with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, bombing and shelling the group in Benghazi and seizing senior members. 

Haftar is acting without government approval and is considered rogue. General Haftar has accused the Libyan government of funding terrorism with its support of the Brigade. Despite acting without orders, Haftar has the support of the Libyan armed forces and moderate Libyan militias. 

Turnout for a June 25 general election in Libya was low, with less than half of the 1.5 million eligible voters casting a vote.

Libya lies immediately west of Egypt. The US Department of State warns against all travel to Libya.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Libya, at least 70 people were killed in clashes between the Libyan National Army and armed militias from late May through June.

After overthrowing Colonel Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, the Libyan government was unable to disarm the independent armed militias that had assisted them. Instead, militias were funded in the hopes they would be loyal to the government. These militia groups number up to 1,700 and operate with very little input from the government.

General Khalifa Haftar, a former army chief of staff under Muammar Gaddafi, has led the Libyan National Army in attacks against the government-funded militia known as the February 17th Brigade, associated with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, bombing and shelling the group in Benghazi and seizing senior members. 

Haftar is acting without government approval and is considered rogue. General Haftar has accused the Libyan government of funding terrorism with its support of the Brigade. Despite acting without orders, Haftar has the support of the Libyan armed forces and moderate Libyan militias. 

Turnout for a June 25 general election in Libya was low, with less than half of the 1.5 million eligible voters casting a vote.

Libya lies immediately west of Egypt. The US Department of State warns against all travel to Libya.