Traveling & Giving: Reader’s Digest popular

By Rosemary Stafford
This item appears on page 57 of the August 2014 issue.
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When traveling, I always take Reader’s Digests with me to give to schools and to students who are learning English. 

From 1992 through 2005, I traveled to Nepal once a year and started carrying the magazines.

A guide’s wife and children read them, then passed them along to their nephews down the block. The issues were then sent to family members living in the eastern rice-paddy region of Nepal, where there were several children in school. One older student showed me a 1984 copy of Reader’s Digest, carefully preserved in plastic wrap by the local grade school.

While traveling on the Trans-Siberian Railway in August ’05, a guide asked if she could read an issue of Reader’s Digest before I passed it on to a school.

ROSEMARY STAFFORD

Pleasant Hill, CA 

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

When traveling, I always take Reader’s Digests with me to give to schools and to students who are learning English. 

From 1992 through 2005, I traveled to Nepal once a year and started carrying the magazines.

A guide’s wife and children read them, then passed them along to their nephews down the block. The issues were then sent to family members living in the eastern rice-paddy region of Nepal, where there were several children in school. One older student showed me a 1984 copy of Reader’s Digest, carefully preserved in plastic wrap by the local grade school.

While traveling on the Trans-Siberian Railway in August ’05, a guide asked if she could read an issue of Reader’s Digest before I passed it on to a school.

ROSEMARY STAFFORD

Pleasant Hill, CA