Dining in Hong Kong

By Jim Delmonte
This item appears on page 34 of the August 2014 issue.
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My wife, Sandy, and I arrived in Hong Kong, China, a stop on our ’round-the-world trip, in July 2013. Looking for excitement, we took the funicular to the top of Victoria Peak. There were lots of little fast-food joints up there plus, at the terminus of the road up to the peak, a place that was definitely upscale. It was in a very fine contemporary house sitting across the street from and south of the terminus for the funicular.

We went in. Most diners were eating family style, sharing platters of food. Prices were high. Water cost $14.50 for two medium-size bottles. The food was tasty. We shared a quesadilla and a bit of Thai food, and our bill came to $65 for both of us.

For dinner, we went to the Felix Restaurant on top of The Peninsula hotel (Salisbury Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China; phone 852 2920 2888) — well recommended for anyone with a fat wallet. With great views from the 26th floor, a glass wall overlooked the harbor. 

The tab for our “special budget dinner,” also including one glass of wine and one beer, was $185 for two. I had Black Pork, a portion smaller than what you’d get in first class on a plane. Sandy had fish, a reasonably sized portion. 

Finally, in the low-rent district near the Saigon Street Novotel (where we stayed) was Cheers (639 Nathan Rd., Hong Kong; phone 852 2308 1668), next to Starbucks. Everyone we asked in our hotel recommended this Chinese restaurant. We found long lines of well-dressed locals. Foreigners had their own prices and a special room to eat in. 

As I live in Hawaii, I know good Chinese food. The food at Cheers was excellent and the service, great. We enjoyed large platters for $27 for the two of us. I don’t recall specifically what we ate, just that it was the BEST food we had in Hong Kong.

Our Novotel wasn’t the best place to stay. Located on a side street way up Nathan Road, it required us to take a bus to see any of the normal tourist sights. The rooms were small but stylish. It was in a rather “rough” area, we felt, but we had no problems.

The best values in Hong Kong for accommodation are the Kowloon Hotel and the YMCA. They’re located where all the action is. 

JIM DELMONTE

Honolulu, HI

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

My wife, Sandy, and I arrived in Hong Kong, China, a stop on our ’round-the-world trip, in July 2013. Looking for excitement, we took the funicular to the top of Victoria Peak. There were lots of little fast-food joints up there plus, at the terminus of the road up to the peak, a place that was definitely upscale. It was in a very fine contemporary house sitting across the street from and south of the terminus for the funicular.

We went in. Most diners were eating family style, sharing platters of food. Prices were high. Water cost $14.50 for two medium-size bottles. The food was tasty. We shared a quesadilla and a bit of Thai food, and our bill came to $65 for both of us.

For dinner, we went to the Felix Restaurant on top of The Peninsula hotel (Salisbury Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China; phone 852 2920 2888) — well recommended for anyone with a fat wallet. With great views from the 26th floor, a glass wall overlooked the harbor. 

The tab for our “special budget dinner,” also including one glass of wine and one beer, was $185 for two. I had Black Pork, a portion smaller than what you’d get in first class on a plane. Sandy had fish, a reasonably sized portion. 

Finally, in the low-rent district near the Saigon Street Novotel (where we stayed) was Cheers (639 Nathan Rd., Hong Kong; phone 852 2308 1668), next to Starbucks. Everyone we asked in our hotel recommended this Chinese restaurant. We found long lines of well-dressed locals. Foreigners had their own prices and a special room to eat in. 

As I live in Hawaii, I know good Chinese food. The food at Cheers was excellent and the service, great. We enjoyed large platters for $27 for the two of us. I don’t recall specifically what we ate, just that it was the BEST food we had in Hong Kong.

Our Novotel wasn’t the best place to stay. Located on a side street way up Nathan Road, it required us to take a bus to see any of the normal tourist sights. The rooms were small but stylish. It was in a rather “rough” area, we felt, but we had no problems.

The best values in Hong Kong for accommodation are the Kowloon Hotel and the YMCA. They’re located where all the action is. 

JIM DELMONTE

Honolulu, HI