Tibetan town burns

This item appears on page 4 of the March 2014 issue.
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In southern China’s “Shangri-La” tourism area, the ancient Tibetan town of Duke­zong — more than 1,300 years old and one of the world’s largest and best-preserved Tibetan towns — burned down in 10 hours on Jan. 11. 

Sparked by a heater in a guest house, the blaze engulfed 343 wooden houses and many historic artifacts. While high winds spread the flames, residents resorted to bucket brigades after hydrants failed and firefighters were unable to get fire engines through the narrow streets. 2,000 people fought the fire.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In southern China’s “Shangri-La” tourism area, the ancient Tibetan town of Duke­zong — more than 1,300 years old and one of the world’s largest and best-preserved Tibetan towns — burned down in 10 hours on Jan. 11. 

Sparked by a heater in a guest house, the blaze engulfed 343 wooden houses and many historic artifacts. While high winds spread the flames, residents resorted to bucket brigades after hydrants failed and firefighters were unable to get fire engines through the narrow streets. 2,000 people fought the fire.