Airports take over exit security

This item appears on page 76 of the March 2014 issue.
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In January, the US Transportation Security Administration stopped providing personnel to guard exits in the secure, “airside” areas of some airports, including New York’s JFK and LaGuardia. As part of a measure to reduce its 2014 budget by $88 million, it transferred control of exit-lane access to local airport authorities.

Airport advocates who object point to the shutdown of Newark International for several hours and subsequent flight delays after a nonpassenger snuck through an exit lane to kiss his girlfriend good-bye in 2010.

Some airports have begun finding solutions that do not require paying exit guards. Syracuse and Atlantic City airports installed portals that each close behind a couple of people at a time and only open outward to the nonsecure side. 

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In January, the US Transportation Security Administration stopped providing personnel to guard exits in the secure, “airside” areas of some airports, including New York’s JFK and LaGuardia. As part of a measure to reduce its 2014 budget by $88 million, it transferred control of exit-lane access to local airport authorities.

Airport advocates who object point to the shutdown of Newark International for several hours and subsequent flight delays after a nonpassenger snuck through an exit lane to kiss his girlfriend good-bye in 2010.

Some airports have begun finding solutions that do not require paying exit guards. Syracuse and Atlantic City airports installed portals that each close behind a couple of people at a time and only open outward to the nonsecure side.