Stay out of Syria

This item appears on page 16 of the December 2013 issue.
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The Department of State continues to warn that no part of Syria should be considered immune from violence, and the potential exists throughout the country for hostile acts, including kidnappings. Across the country, indiscriminate shelling and aerial bombardment, even in densely populated urban areas, have significantly increased the risk of death or serious injury. 

There is also a threat from terrorist groups, whose tactics include the use of suicide bombers, kidnapping, use of small and heavy arms and improvised explosive devices in major city centers. Public places, such as government buildings, shopping areas and open spaces, have been targeted.

Border areas are frequent targets of shelling and other armed conflict and are clogged by internally displaced refugees.

The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has exacerbated hardships inside the country. Phone and Internet connections in Syria have become increasingly unreliable. 

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The Department of State continues to warn that no part of Syria should be considered immune from violence, and the potential exists throughout the country for hostile acts, including kidnappings. Across the country, indiscriminate shelling and aerial bombardment, even in densely populated urban areas, have significantly increased the risk of death or serious injury. 

There is also a threat from terrorist groups, whose tactics include the use of suicide bombers, kidnapping, use of small and heavy arms and improvised explosive devices in major city centers. Public places, such as government buildings, shopping areas and open spaces, have been targeted.

Border areas are frequent targets of shelling and other armed conflict and are clogged by internally displaced refugees.

The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has exacerbated hardships inside the country. Phone and Internet connections in Syria have become increasingly unreliable.