Drug-war strife in Mexico

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This item appears on page 68 of the September 2013 issue.
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The US Department of State points out that millions of people safely visit Mexico each year. Nevertheless, the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) which engage in narcotics trafficking throughout Mexico, and the TCOs, among themselves, are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the US border region. TCOs have erected unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that failed to stop at checkpoints. Most victims who complied with carjackers have reported that they were not physically harmed. Travelers should cooperate at all checkpoints. Violent incidents have occurred most frequently at night and on isolated roads. 

The number of kidnappings and disappearances throughout Mexico is of particular concern, with both local and expatriate communities victimized.

Resort areas and tourist destinations generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that is reported in the border region and in areas along major trafficking routes.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The US Department of State points out that millions of people safely visit Mexico each year. Nevertheless, the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) which engage in narcotics trafficking throughout Mexico, and the TCOs, among themselves, are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the US border region. TCOs have erected unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that failed to stop at checkpoints. Most victims who complied with carjackers have reported that they were not physically harmed. Travelers should cooperate at all checkpoints. Violent incidents have occurred most frequently at night and on isolated roads. 

The number of kidnappings and disappearances throughout Mexico is of particular concern, with both local and expatriate communities victimized.

Resort areas and tourist destinations generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that is reported in the border region and in areas along major trafficking routes.