Singapore, Malaysia air

By
This item appears on page 68 of the August 2013 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Indonesia each year during the dry months of June-September, farmers illegally burn forests in order to plant crops. Singapore and Malaysia can suffer the resulting pollution.

In Singapore during a few days in late June this year, a record high of 401 was reached on the Air Pollution Index, which measures five known pollutants. (Levels over 100 are considered unhealthy.) In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a level of 200 was reached.

Low-level winds dispersed most of the haze in Singapore over three days, but the pollution continued in Malaysia, where a state of emergency was declared in two southern districts and more than 200 schools were closed.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Indonesia each year during the dry months of June-September, farmers illegally burn forests in order to plant crops. Singapore and Malaysia can suffer the resulting pollution.

In Singapore during a few days in late June this year, a record high of 401 was reached on the Air Pollution Index, which measures five known pollutants. (Levels over 100 are considered unhealthy.) In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a level of 200 was reached.

Low-level winds dispersed most of the haze in Singapore over three days, but the pollution continued in Malaysia, where a state of emergency was declared in two southern districts and more than 200 schools were closed.