Music! Music! Music!

This item appears on page 56 of the August 2013 issue.
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After we printed a number of letters about the recorded music they picked up while traveling (Jan. ’12, pg. 48 & Feb. ’12, pg. 42), a few more subscribers wrote in. We present their finds here.

 

We like to purchase CDs to bring home to remind us of our travels. Two are our particular favorites. 

“The Traditional Music of the Japanese Geisha” (2000, Legacy; $12) is a CD of various artists, with singing and instrumentals. I put it on the stereo when we eat a Japanese meal, and we can almost imagine that we are back in JAPAN! 

We also purchased “Cape Breton by Request” (2001, Stephen MacDonald; various artists), which was highly recommended by our guide. The music brings back all the serenity and love for the land that we so admired on our CANADIAN Maritime trip in September ’11.

Irma Gurman, Smithtown, NY

 

Finding the right CD to remind me of another wonderful trip is always a welcome task — marimba bands in Guatemala, Peruvian panpipes, the sounds of Carnaval in Bolivia, a Dixieland jazz band on the Karl Bridge in Prague. . . . 

The only time I have been disappointed was with CDs purchased in Cuba in 2009. I heard wonderful music while there, but when I played the CDs at home, I found them to be of a very poor quality, so buyer, beware! In this case, I consoled myself by thinking that I, at least, helped support the musicians. 

Sheila Monk, Richland, MO

 

My friend and I visited Italy in 2004 and were lucky enough to stop at the Abbazia di Sant’Antimo (Castelnuovo dell’Abate 53020, Tuscany, Italy; phone 0577 835659 — open 6 a.m.-9 p.m. daily) just in time to hear the monks singing their noontime psalms in the abbey. 

It was truly a magical experience and was described very well in their literature: “… the extreme perfection and balance of the tones of the psalmody…” and “… the natural to-ing and fro-ing between the choirs that is carried out exercises a beneficent, pacifying action in the depths of the soul, every soul: like that of a mother rocking a child so as to give it confidence and peace.” 

The abbey had a small gift shop, and, on the recommendation of the salesperson, I purchased a CD entitled “Psallam Tibi.” It starts with the abbey bells ringing, followed by the monks singing, reminiscent of those we heard in the abbey. 

I would listen to the CD almost every morning as I did my exercise routine, and it would transport me back to that special place and time.

Mary Carlson, Hood River, OR

 

Three of us from Santa Clarita, California, visited Tena, our Sister City in Ecuador, in 2001. On the way from Tena to Quito, our driver played a CD that filled the car with beautiful music. I asked who the group was and he said, “Harkas.”

Back home, I tried to order the CD but couldn’t find “Harkas” on the Internet. I asked several local people with Andean origins and finally learned that the group’s name was Los Kjarkas (Cochamba, Bolivia; phone 430 8235). I ordered a CD, “Por Siempre,” and it is, indeed, so beautiful. 

Returning to South America in 2003, as I landed in Cusco, Peru, and walked up the jetway, I saw a sign which said, in English, “This is what you’ve been waiting for.” Just then, I heard an Andean folk group, complete with panpipes, strike up that same type of beautiful music. It wasn’t Los Kjarkas, but it certainly was what I had been waiting for.

A week later, when I was in Kjarkas’ native Bolivia, I bought more of their CDs. Each time I play one, it takes me back to the Andes.

Carl Boyer, Newhall, CA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

After we printed a number of letters about the recorded music they picked up while traveling (Jan. ’12, pg. 48 & Feb. ’12, pg. 42), a few more subscribers wrote in. We present their finds here.

 

We like to purchase CDs to bring home to remind us of our travels. Two are our particular favorites. 

“The Traditional Music of the Japanese Geisha” (2000, Legacy; $12) is a CD of various artists, with singing and instrumentals. I put it on the stereo when we eat a Japanese meal, and we can almost imagine that we are back in JAPAN! 

We also purchased “Cape Breton by Request” (2001, Stephen MacDonald; various artists), which was highly recommended by our guide. The music brings back all the serenity and love for the land that we so admired on our CANADIAN Maritime trip in September ’11.

Irma Gurman, Smithtown, NY

 

Finding the right CD to remind me of another wonderful trip is always a welcome task — marimba bands in Guatemala, Peruvian panpipes, the sounds of Carnaval in Bolivia, a Dixieland jazz band on the Karl Bridge in Prague. . . . 

The only time I have been disappointed was with CDs purchased in Cuba in 2009. I heard wonderful music while there, but when I played the CDs at home, I found them to be of a very poor quality, so buyer, beware! In this case, I consoled myself by thinking that I, at least, helped support the musicians. 

Sheila Monk, Richland, MO

 

My friend and I visited Italy in 2004 and were lucky enough to stop at the Abbazia di Sant’Antimo (Castelnuovo dell’Abate 53020, Tuscany, Italy; phone 0577 835659 — open 6 a.m.-9 p.m. daily) just in time to hear the monks singing their noontime psalms in the abbey. 

It was truly a magical experience and was described very well in their literature: “… the extreme perfection and balance of the tones of the psalmody…” and “… the natural to-ing and fro-ing between the choirs that is carried out exercises a beneficent, pacifying action in the depths of the soul, every soul: like that of a mother rocking a child so as to give it confidence and peace.” 

The abbey had a small gift shop, and, on the recommendation of the salesperson, I purchased a CD entitled “Psallam Tibi.” It starts with the abbey bells ringing, followed by the monks singing, reminiscent of those we heard in the abbey. 

I would listen to the CD almost every morning as I did my exercise routine, and it would transport me back to that special place and time.

Mary Carlson, Hood River, OR

 

Three of us from Santa Clarita, California, visited Tena, our Sister City in Ecuador, in 2001. On the way from Tena to Quito, our driver played a CD that filled the car with beautiful music. I asked who the group was and he said, “Harkas.”

Back home, I tried to order the CD but couldn’t find “Harkas” on the Internet. I asked several local people with Andean origins and finally learned that the group’s name was Los Kjarkas (Cochamba, Bolivia; phone 430 8235). I ordered a CD, “Por Siempre,” and it is, indeed, so beautiful. 

Returning to South America in 2003, as I landed in Cusco, Peru, and walked up the jetway, I saw a sign which said, in English, “This is what you’ve been waiting for.” Just then, I heard an Andean folk group, complete with panpipes, strike up that same type of beautiful music. It wasn’t Los Kjarkas, but it certainly was what I had been waiting for.

A week later, when I was in Kjarkas’ native Bolivia, I bought more of their CDs. Each time I play one, it takes me back to the Andes.

Carl Boyer, Newhall, CA