Iran ‘interesting’

By Nicky Baker
This item appears on page 52 of the May 2013 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I agree with the letter written by Marvin Primack (March ’13, pg. 26) concerning misconceptions about Iran. I visited there with MIR Corporation (Seattle, WA; 800/424-7289) at the end of 2011. When the people asked where we were from and were told the US, the response was overwhelming: “Oh, Americans! We like America.” 

The only negativism I saw were anti-American paintings on the walls of the former American Embassy. Our group later was told that the government paid artists to paint these pictures.

Women did wear head coverings of various types (with some hair showing), but those we spoke to told us that they would prefer not to wear them.

In Isfahan, police in Imam Square told us that their function was to act as “Tourist Police” and help visitors find with any difficulties. Then there were what were called the “Morals Police” or “Watchers,” who primarily waited at malls and movie theaters where the younger people gathered. They watched for “improper” dress. 

One American woman was told by the Morals Police to go back to the hotel and change, as she, in their opinion, was not appropriately dressed.

It was an extremely interesting and enlightening trip.

NICKY BAKER

Oro Valley, AZ

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I agree with the letter written by Marvin Primack (March ’13, pg. 26) concerning misconceptions about Iran. I visited there with MIR Corporation (Seattle, WA; 800/424-7289) at the end of 2011. When the people asked where we were from and were told the US, the response was overwhelming: “Oh, Americans! We like America.” 

The only negativism I saw were anti-American paintings on the walls of the former American Embassy. Our group later was told that the government paid artists to paint these pictures.

Women did wear head coverings of various types (with some hair showing), but those we spoke to told us that they would prefer not to wear them.

In Isfahan, police in Imam Square told us that their function was to act as “Tourist Police” and help visitors find with any difficulties. Then there were what were called the “Morals Police” or “Watchers,” who primarily waited at malls and movie theaters where the younger people gathered. They watched for “improper” dress. 

One American woman was told by the Morals Police to go back to the hotel and change, as she, in their opinion, was not appropriately dressed.

It was an extremely interesting and enlightening trip.

NICKY BAKER

Oro Valley, AZ