Feeding elephants in Myanmar

By Patricia Mastrobuono
This item appears on page 15 of the April 2013 issue.
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In the course of making plans with an in-country guide for a tour of Myanmar about four months later, my husband and I signed up for a day program at Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp (17 [5A], Kyaung St., Ahlone Township, Yangon, Myanmar; phone +95 9 73107278 or 4923284 or 5170687).

The camp offers a variety of programs, and for $100 per person, we opted for a half-day introduction to the seven elephants that lived in the camp (Nov. 25, 2012).

After feeding the elephants, we were offered the opportunity to get in the river to help the mahouts wash these “retired” magnificent animals, then we went on a short ride on elephantback. Afterward, we were offered the chance to plant a teak sapling. This is part of the reforestation project that is the vision of the owners.

A very tasty lunch, which had been prepared by a local woman, was served to us, and we had the ability to interact with the owners, Htun Htun Wynn and Tin Win Maw.

I would highly recommend this to those touring in the Kalaw area or as a day trip out of Yangon.

PATRICIA MASTROBUONO
Avalon, NJ

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In the course of making plans with an in-country guide for a tour of Myanmar about four months later, my husband and I signed up for a day program at Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp (17 [5A], Kyaung St., Ahlone Township, Yangon, Myanmar; phone +95 9 73107278 or 4923284 or 5170687).

The camp offers a variety of programs, and for $100 per person, we opted for a half-day introduction to the seven elephants that lived in the camp (Nov. 25, 2012).

After feeding the elephants, we were offered the opportunity to get in the river to help the mahouts wash these “retired” magnificent animals, then we went on a short ride on elephantback. Afterward, we were offered the chance to plant a teak sapling. This is part of the reforestation project that is the vision of the owners.

A very tasty lunch, which had been prepared by a local woman, was served to us, and we had the ability to interact with the owners, Htun Htun Wynn and Tin Win Maw.

I would highly recommend this to those touring in the Kalaw area or as a day trip out of Yangon.

PATRICIA MASTROBUONO
Avalon, NJ