A night out in San Miguel

By Judy Hodges
This item appears on page 57 of the January 2013 issue.
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The Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende offers a number of cultural events every week, as my husband and I found in February and March 2012 (Nov. ’12, pg. 14).

Anything sponsored by Pro Musica, which offers classical music at its finest, will be first rate. All performances are held at St. Paul’s Church (Callzada del Cardo #6), and tickets cost 100, 150 or 250 pesos (near $7.75, $11.50 or $19). We buy the 100-peso tickets because the seats are folding chairs rather than church pews.

Another interesting venue is La Casa Verde (Prolongación de Pila Seca 65C), an art gallery owned by a couple who gives one-hour presentations on famous (and not-so-famous) artists. For 100 pesos, you’ll receive appetizers and a drink and a rousing rendition of what, say, Cezanne was really like, perhaps followed the next week by tales of the humor of François Rabelais.

A lovely place to spend a rainy afternoon or evening is the wonderful Pocket Theatre (Calle Hernández Macias 95), which seats about 30 people in each of its two theaters. For 80 pesos, you’ll receive one alcoholic beverage of your choice (or water or soda), a bag of popcorn and the chance to see a film-festival winner, an Academy Award winner, an intriguing foreign film or a thought–provoking documentary.

Each week the schedule changes, and sometimes films with sold-out showings are brought back by popular demand.

JUDY HODGES
Denton, MD

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende offers a number of cultural events every week, as my husband and I found in February and March 2012 (Nov. ’12, pg. 14).

Anything sponsored by Pro Musica, which offers classical music at its finest, will be first rate. All performances are held at St. Paul’s Church (Callzada del Cardo #6), and tickets cost 100, 150 or 250 pesos (near $7.75, $11.50 or $19). We buy the 100-peso tickets because the seats are folding chairs rather than church pews.

Another interesting venue is La Casa Verde (Prolongación de Pila Seca 65C), an art gallery owned by a couple who gives one-hour presentations on famous (and not-so-famous) artists. For 100 pesos, you’ll receive appetizers and a drink and a rousing rendition of what, say, Cezanne was really like, perhaps followed the next week by tales of the humor of François Rabelais.

A lovely place to spend a rainy afternoon or evening is the wonderful Pocket Theatre (Calle Hernández Macias 95), which seats about 30 people in each of its two theaters. For 80 pesos, you’ll receive one alcoholic beverage of your choice (or water or soda), a bag of popcorn and the chance to see a film-festival winner, an Academy Award winner, an intriguing foreign film or a thought–provoking documentary.

Each week the schedule changes, and sometimes films with sold-out showings are brought back by popular demand.

JUDY HODGES
Denton, MD