It's a keeper!

This item appears on page 52 of the February 2012 issue.
This is subscriber only post.
Get one year of online-only access — only $15!
Below is a sample of the article.
Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Tell ITN about the funniest thing that ever happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the United States.) There are no restrictions on length. The ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged.

This month’s winner is MARK CRAWFORD of Whittier, CA:

During my stay in Tokyo in December 2010, I was navigating through the labyrinth of the Tsukiji Fish Market eager to try some fresh sushi. My eye caught a display case of different sushi dishes between two tables stacked with different sorts of fish waiting to be cut up.

In restaurants in Japan, it’s normal to see displayed in a window or case plastic foods indicating to the patron what the real food looks like once prepared. So when the gentleman approached from behind the display, I pointed to a particular dish. He disappeared to the back of his shop and returned with a brown paper bag, which he handed to me.

When I opened the bag, I discovered that I had bought an actual plastic replica of sushi, not edible sushi.

Instead of returning the item, I decided to make it a souvenir and proceeded to find a very long line at a different location where they served some amazing sushi.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Tell ITN about the funniest thing that ever happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the United States.) There are no restrictions on length. The ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged.

This month’s winner is MARK CRAWFORD of Whittier, CA:

During my stay in Tokyo in December 2010, I was navigating through the labyrinth of the Tsukiji Fish Market eager to try some fresh sushi. My eye caught a display case of different sushi dishes between two tables stacked with different sorts of fish waiting to be cut up.

In restaurants in Japan, it’s normal to see displayed in a window or case plastic foods indicating to the patron what the real food looks like once prepared. So when the gentleman approached from behind the display, I pointed to a particular dish. He disappeared to the back of his shop and returned with a brown paper bag, which he handed to me.

When I opened the bag, I discovered that I had bought an actual plastic replica of sushi, not edible sushi.

Instead of returning the item, I decided to make it a souvenir and proceeded to find a very long line at a different location where they served some amazing sushi.