Camera support

This item appears on page 55 of the August 2011 issue.
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I read the advice about reducing camera shake (Jan. ’11, pg. 85) and agree with Mr. Noble to a point. I think that another solution would be to tuck the arms in but hold the camera so the shutter button is on the top.

This would prevent the camera from moving because the hand that is holding the weight of the camera is not the one that has to move to trip the shutter. The bottom hand holds the camera’s weight and the top hand supports the camera against the photographer’s head.

Try this on any camera, especially a digital SLR or one of the new Four Thirds cameras. Some point-and-shoot cameras have their own problems because of not having a viewfinder.

ED FITZGERALD
Torrance, CA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I read the advice about reducing camera shake (Jan. ’11, pg. 85) and agree with Mr. Noble to a point. I think that another solution would be to tuck the arms in but hold the camera so the shutter button is on the top.

This would prevent the camera from moving because the hand that is holding the weight of the camera is not the one that has to move to trip the shutter. The bottom hand holds the camera’s weight and the top hand supports the camera against the photographer’s head.

Try this on any camera, especially a digital SLR or one of the new Four Thirds cameras. Some point-and-shoot cameras have their own problems because of not having a viewfinder.

ED FITZGERALD
Torrance, CA