Da Vinci’s drawings

This item appears on page 76 of the March 2011 issue.
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The Codex Atlanticus, a 1,119-page compilation of Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings and writings never shown to the public, are being displayed 22 pages at a time at two sites in Milan, Italy, through 2015.

The exhibition began in September 2009, and every three months a new set of pages is displayed, with themes like “Animal drawings & shapes” and “Astronomy & Cosmology.”

A ticket (must reserve) gives you a half hour at either site: the Pinocoteca Ambrosiana (Piazza Pio XI, 2; phone +39 051 649 32 65), open 10-6 Tues.-Sun., with tickets €15 (near $21), or the Sacrestia del Bramante (Via Caradosso 1), 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Tues.-Sun., tickets €10. A ticket to both sites costs €20.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The Codex Atlanticus, a 1,119-page compilation of Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings and writings never shown to the public, are being displayed 22 pages at a time at two sites in Milan, Italy, through 2015.

The exhibition began in September 2009, and every three months a new set of pages is displayed, with themes like “Animal drawings & shapes” and “Astronomy & Cosmology.”

A ticket (must reserve) gives you a half hour at either site: the Pinocoteca Ambrosiana (Piazza Pio XI, 2; phone +39 051 649 32 65), open 10-6 Tues.-Sun., with tickets €15 (near $21), or the Sacrestia del Bramante (Via Caradosso 1), 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Tues.-Sun., tickets €10. A ticket to both sites costs €20.