Stripe sufficient

This item appears on page 50 of the November 2010 issue.
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I read the subscribers’ experiences with chip-and-PIN cards (Aug. ’10, pg. 16). My wife. Jean, and I were in London in June ’10, and the only times that we could not use our magnetic-stripe credit cards were when using machines to purchase train tickets or upgrade our Oyster cards.

In both situations, we were able to go to the ticket office and make the purchase with an agent, who swiped our card through a machine and had us sign the charge slip.

When we presented our credit card at a restaurant, the server would bring a handheld, wireless credit card machine to the table and swipe our card through it.

In order to get cash, we followed our bank’s advice and sought out Barclays Bank ATMs. Our ATM card with a PIN worked in these every time.

ROBERT L. MAJOR

Norfolk, VA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I read the subscribers’ experiences with chip-and-PIN cards (Aug. ’10, pg. 16). My wife. Jean, and I were in London in June ’10, and the only times that we could not use our magnetic-stripe credit cards were when using machines to purchase train tickets or upgrade our Oyster cards.

In both situations, we were able to go to the ticket office and make the purchase with an agent, who swiped our card through a machine and had us sign the charge slip.

When we presented our credit card at a restaurant, the server would bring a handheld, wireless credit card machine to the table and swipe our card through it.

In order to get cash, we followed our bank’s advice and sought out Barclays Bank ATMs. Our ATM card with a PIN worked in these every time.

ROBERT L. MAJOR

Norfolk, VA