‘Lasagna’ packing

This item appears on page 51 of the November 2010 issue.
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I’m an old lady whose early travels were during World War II. When my parents realized that railway stations would no longer have porters, I was told to pack only what I could carry. That not only introduced a weight limit, it put a premium on size, too, for smaller was easier to carry.

I learned to pack into every inch of a suitcase. Heavy, bulky items go in first, to the rear at the bottom. Other odd shapes go in next, nestled with any underwear and socks/stockings that haven’t been stuffed into shoes.

The idea is to arrive at a level surface, with the outerwear carefully folded to utilize, as far as possible, the full area of the suitcase.

My husband has labeled these layers my “lasagna.”

MAY C. TARGETT

Cleveland, OH

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

I’m an old lady whose early travels were during World War II. When my parents realized that railway stations would no longer have porters, I was told to pack only what I could carry. That not only introduced a weight limit, it put a premium on size, too, for smaller was easier to carry.

I learned to pack into every inch of a suitcase. Heavy, bulky items go in first, to the rear at the bottom. Other odd shapes go in next, nestled with any underwear and socks/stockings that haven’t been stuffed into shoes.

The idea is to arrive at a level surface, with the outerwear carefully folded to utilize, as far as possible, the full area of the suitcase.

My husband has labeled these layers my “lasagna.”

MAY C. TARGETT

Cleveland, OH