Heathrow-Windsor jaunt

This item appears on page 15 of the September 2010 issue.
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The “Crooked House,” so named because it leans, was built around 1718. It now operates as the Market Cross House, serving breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea.

Having a layover of about nine hours at London Heathrow, I decided to take the bus the 45 minutes to Windsor Castle for a visit. It proved to be a lovely experience, despite the 35°F temperature and the snow flurries that occurred on Feb. 8, 2010.

From the new Terminal 5, the local blue bus (numbers 71 and 77) leaves from platform 9, right outside Terminal 5. Ask, as one bus is more direct than the other.

For £5.4 (near $8) round trip, I was transported through the countryside and several English villages, as well as past a very quaint, old college called Royal Holloway, and dropped off near the “Crooked House” right in front of the castle. I made sure to ask the driver where to wait for the return bus.

Windsor Castle is one of the largest occupied castles in the world. It also is one of the official residences of the Queen and Duke of Wales.

I went through the State Apartments and the Drawings Gallery and viewed Queen Mary’s Doll House. To me, the interesting thing about the castle is that the Queen still entertains there.

Note: there is NO photography allowed inside the State Apartments or St. George’s Chapel, but you can take pictures in the courtyards, complete with palace guards and the tall hats. Try to get there when they have the changing of the guard. (This takes place daily at 11:30 from May until the end of June and on alternate days the rest of the year, weather permitting.)

An alleyway off the main courtyard of Windsor Castle. Photos: Bruck

As a senior over 60, I paid £14.50 (currently, £18.50) for entry to the castle. I winged it alone, but there are guided tours and free audio tours. For information pertaining to families or handicapped accessibility, phone 020 7766 7324 or visit www.royalcollection.org.uk.

Buses run every 20 to 30 minutes, so if you see something interesting and have the time, you can hop off and get back on a later one. Ask for information in the Admissions Centre at Windsor. You can even bring your carry-on, leave it at the coat check in one of the buildings and pick it up on the way out.

I recommend this adventure. On the way back, we even crossed the Thames River.

JOYCE BRUCK

Ocean Ridge, FL

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.
The “Crooked House,” so named because it leans, was built around 1718. It now operates as the Market Cross House, serving breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea.

Having a layover of about nine hours at London Heathrow, I decided to take the bus the 45 minutes to Windsor Castle for a visit. It proved to be a lovely experience, despite the 35°F temperature and the snow flurries that occurred on Feb. 8, 2010.

From the new Terminal 5, the local blue bus (numbers 71 and 77) leaves from platform 9, right outside Terminal 5. Ask, as one bus is more direct than the other.

For £5.4 (near $8) round trip, I was transported through the countryside and several English villages, as well as past a very quaint, old college called Royal Holloway, and dropped off near the “Crooked House” right in front of the castle. I made sure to ask the driver where to wait for the return bus.

Windsor Castle is one of the largest occupied castles in the world. It also is one of the official residences of the Queen and Duke of Wales.

I went through the State Apartments and the Drawings Gallery and viewed Queen Mary’s Doll House. To me, the interesting thing about the castle is that the Queen still entertains there.

Note: there is NO photography allowed inside the State Apartments or St. George’s Chapel, but you can take pictures in the courtyards, complete with palace guards and the tall hats. Try to get there when they have the changing of the guard. (This takes place daily at 11:30 from May until the end of June and on alternate days the rest of the year, weather permitting.)

An alleyway off the main courtyard of Windsor Castle. Photos: Bruck

As a senior over 60, I paid £14.50 (currently, £18.50) for entry to the castle. I winged it alone, but there are guided tours and free audio tours. For information pertaining to families or handicapped accessibility, phone 020 7766 7324 or visit www.royalcollection.org.uk.

Buses run every 20 to 30 minutes, so if you see something interesting and have the time, you can hop off and get back on a later one. Ask for information in the Admissions Centre at Windsor. You can even bring your carry-on, leave it at the coat check in one of the buildings and pick it up on the way out.

I recommend this adventure. On the way back, we even crossed the Thames River.

JOYCE BRUCK

Ocean Ridge, FL