Glasgow, Lake District

This item appears on page 16 of the April 2010 issue.
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After visiting our new granddaughter in London in October ’09, my wife, Kay, and I traveled through Scotland and England’s Lake District via train. We obtained our Senior Railcards at a local train station for £26 (near $42) each, but it would have cost only £23.40 if purchased online at www.senior-railcard.co.uk. They are also available (at full price) from all London airports except Heathrow.

By using the passes, we saved £166 ($286) on the total rail fares during our 9-day excursion. And the passes are good for one year from the date of purchase.

Setting out by rail from London’s Euston Station, we headed for Glasgow, where we stayed four nights. We then stayed two nights in Bowness on Windermere, Cumbria, England.

We booked a full-day excursion of the Lake District with Lakes Supertours (1 High St., Winder­mere, Lake District, Cumbria LA23 1AF, U.K.; phone +44 [0] 15394 42751 or 88133, fax 15394 46026) for £27 ($43) each.

The guide/driver Steve picked us up in a minivan with his faithful companion, Paddy, a 13-year-old border collie. Our group had only five in the morning and nine later.

Steve was superb. He knew the names and history of seemingly every hillock, tarn and rivulet and recounted the historical and cultural significance of each area and structure, whether Pictish, Scottish, Roman, Stuart, Tudor or Edwardian.

Lunch was on our own in Keswick. In the afternoon we stopped at unique waterfalls, a working slate mine and gorgeous overlooks; took a 20-minute boat ride on Derwentwater lake; explored country lanes, and, finally, toured Wordsworth’s Dove Cottage in Grasmere before returning to Bowness just as it began to rain.

Our final dinner was at Lakeview (Glebe Rd., Bowness on Windermere; phone 01539 445530), one of a chain of Crown Carveries, overlooking Lake Windermere. The midweek carvery, which included ham, turkey, roast beef, Yorkshire pudding and stuffing plus unlimited vegetables, cost £3.50 ($5.60) each. With wine, beer and tip, our tariff was £21 ($34).

The central location of train stations made visiting English villages an easy touring option, and a plethora of B&Bs and restaurants within walking distance of the stations made this trip a welcome alternative to the pricey and sometimes confusing challenge of driving on the left side of the road.

AL STANDISH
Port Ludlow, WA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

After visiting our new granddaughter in London in October ’09, my wife, Kay, and I traveled through Scotland and England’s Lake District via train. We obtained our Senior Railcards at a local train station for £26 (near $42) each, but it would have cost only £23.40 if purchased online at www.senior-railcard.co.uk. They are also available (at full price) from all London airports except Heathrow.

By using the passes, we saved £166 ($286) on the total rail fares during our 9-day excursion. And the passes are good for one year from the date of purchase.

Setting out by rail from London’s Euston Station, we headed for Glasgow, where we stayed four nights. We then stayed two nights in Bowness on Windermere, Cumbria, England.

We booked a full-day excursion of the Lake District with Lakes Supertours (1 High St., Winder­mere, Lake District, Cumbria LA23 1AF, U.K.; phone +44 [0] 15394 42751 or 88133, fax 15394 46026) for £27 ($43) each.

The guide/driver Steve picked us up in a minivan with his faithful companion, Paddy, a 13-year-old border collie. Our group had only five in the morning and nine later.

Steve was superb. He knew the names and history of seemingly every hillock, tarn and rivulet and recounted the historical and cultural significance of each area and structure, whether Pictish, Scottish, Roman, Stuart, Tudor or Edwardian.

Lunch was on our own in Keswick. In the afternoon we stopped at unique waterfalls, a working slate mine and gorgeous overlooks; took a 20-minute boat ride on Derwentwater lake; explored country lanes, and, finally, toured Wordsworth’s Dove Cottage in Grasmere before returning to Bowness just as it began to rain.

Our final dinner was at Lakeview (Glebe Rd., Bowness on Windermere; phone 01539 445530), one of a chain of Crown Carveries, overlooking Lake Windermere. The midweek carvery, which included ham, turkey, roast beef, Yorkshire pudding and stuffing plus unlimited vegetables, cost £3.50 ($5.60) each. With wine, beer and tip, our tariff was £21 ($34).

The central location of train stations made visiting English villages an easy touring option, and a plethora of B&Bs and restaurants within walking distance of the stations made this trip a welcome alternative to the pricey and sometimes confusing challenge of driving on the left side of the road.

AL STANDISH
Port Ludlow, WA