Korean landmark torched

This item appears on page 90 of the April 2008 issue.
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The Namdaemun, a 600-year-old gate that guarded the ancient walled city of Seoul, Korea, was reduced to its foundations on Feb. 10 in a 5-hour fire fought by 100 firemen. The structure allegedly was set ablaze by a 69-year-old man who felt he had not been sufficiently compensated by the government for property.

Completed in 1398, the 2-story Great South Gate, which in 1962 was designated South Korea’s number-one national treasure, was made of wood and stone with a pagoda-shaped roof. Officials have stated it will take $21 million and three years to rebuild the landmark.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The Namdaemun, a 600-year-old gate that guarded the ancient walled city of Seoul, Korea, was reduced to its foundations on Feb. 10 in a 5-hour fire fought by 100 firemen. The structure allegedly was set ablaze by a 69-year-old man who felt he had not been sufficiently compensated by the government for property.

Completed in 1398, the 2-story Great South Gate, which in 1962 was designated South Korea’s number-one national treasure, was made of wood and stone with a pagoda-shaped roof. Officials have stated it will take $21 million and three years to rebuild the landmark.