Colombia problems

This item appears on page 23 of the April 2008 issue.
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The Department of State continues to warn U.S. citizens of the dangers of travel to Colombia.

While violence has decreased markedly in many urban destinations, including Bogotá, Medellín, Barranquilla and Cartagena, Cali continues to experience more violence than most other large cities, and the level of violence in Buenaventura remains high.

Small towns and rural areas of Colombia still can be extremely dangerous due to the presence of narco-terrorists. Common crime remains a significant problem in many areas, both urban and rural.

The incidence of kidnapping in Colombia has diminished significantly from its peak at the beginning of this decade. Nevertheless, civilians continue to be kidnapped and held for ransom or as political bargaining chips.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

The Department of State continues to warn U.S. citizens of the dangers of travel to Colombia.

While violence has decreased markedly in many urban destinations, including Bogotá, Medellín, Barranquilla and Cartagena, Cali continues to experience more violence than most other large cities, and the level of violence in Buenaventura remains high.

Small towns and rural areas of Colombia still can be extremely dangerous due to the presence of narco-terrorists. Common crime remains a significant problem in many areas, both urban and rural.

The incidence of kidnapping in Colombia has diminished significantly from its peak at the beginning of this decade. Nevertheless, civilians continue to be kidnapped and held for ransom or as political bargaining chips.