Photo tip

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When taking a picture and confronted with snow and ice, there is an easy way to have a camera’s white balance capture the brilliant white and not make the photo gray.

Aim the camera at an area of “neutral” light and then hold the exposure lock and compose and take the shot. I learned this from Art Wolfe on an Antarctic cruise.

Dr. J. CURTIS KOVACS
Sun City, AZ

An area of “neutral” light is something of the tone of “middle gray,” perhaps someone’s jacket. Grass is perfect (but hard to find in Antarctica). Curiously, a checkerboard pattern would also serve well, as the camera’s light meter would strike a balance.

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

When taking a picture and confronted with snow and ice, there is an easy way to have a camera’s white balance capture the brilliant white and not make the photo gray.

Aim the camera at an area of “neutral” light and then hold the exposure lock and compose and take the shot. I learned this from Art Wolfe on an Antarctic cruise.

Dr. J. CURTIS KOVACS
Sun City, AZ

An area of “neutral” light is something of the tone of “middle gray,” perhaps someone’s jacket. Grass is perfect (but hard to find in Antarctica). Curiously, a checkerboard pattern would also serve well, as the camera’s light meter would strike a balance.