Funniest Thing for July

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Tell ITN about the funniest thing that ever happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. There are no restrictions on length. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the U.S., Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean.) The ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged.

This month’s winner is KATHY SKILTON of Orange, California:

In 2000 we embarked on a driving trip through Kenya. We stumbled on Buffalo Springs, a tented safari camp that had seen better days and was being manned by a small staff. The location was great and we were the only guests for three days.

On our second day, after lunch a group of young Samburu tribesmen came to the lodge hoping to find guests to entertain. We told them we would be happy to pay to see them dance. Their performance was wonderful, but the best part was sitting with them and socializing.

Only the leader could speak English, and he interpreted our questions as well as theirs. When my husband gave them a dollar bill, the leader examined it very closely. He then asked who the man was on the bill. When we answered, “Our president,” he looked very surprised, squinted and stared at the bill again.

Then he asked, “This is Bill Clinton?”

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

Tell ITN about the funniest thing that ever happened to you while traveling in a foreign country. There are no restrictions on length. (ITN prints no info on destinations in the U.S., Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean.) The ITN staff will choose each month’s winner, who will receive a free one-year subscription to ITN. Entries not chosen cannot be acknowledged.

This month’s winner is KATHY SKILTON of Orange, California:

In 2000 we embarked on a driving trip through Kenya. We stumbled on Buffalo Springs, a tented safari camp that had seen better days and was being manned by a small staff. The location was great and we were the only guests for three days.

On our second day, after lunch a group of young Samburu tribesmen came to the lodge hoping to find guests to entertain. We told them we would be happy to pay to see them dance. Their performance was wonderful, but the best part was sitting with them and socializing.

Only the leader could speak English, and he interpreted our questions as well as theirs. When my husband gave them a dollar bill, the leader examined it very closely. He then asked who the man was on the bill. When we answered, “Our president,” he looked very surprised, squinted and stared at the bill again.

Then he asked, “This is Bill Clinton?”