Friendly Manxmen

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In September ’01, shortly after the tragedy of 9-11, we traveled to Ireland for two weeks and then to the Isle of Man. As U.S. citizens, we were met in both places with kindness, understanding and concern.

When we arrived on the Isle of Man, a game of golf was immediately scheduled. But on the chosen morning, when we arrived at the King Edward Bay Golf Club via taxi, the only person around was the golf pro. After renting clubs to my husband (I don’t play), he told us he was leaving for the day and said, “Just put them in the locker room. I’ll leave it unlocked.”

So off we went, the only two people on the course. It was cold and windy but exhilarating. The course was situated high up in the hills of the central part of the island, and the views were incredible.

After 18 holes, we dragged ourselves back to the clubhouse and returned the rented clubs to the unlocked locker room. Then it dawned on us: we were alone! No phone, no car, not one other person within about 10 miles.

Panic almost set in, but in the distance we could see a car slowly making its way up the hill toward us. The gentleman in the arriving car told us that he was hoping to enjoy lunch, but since the restaurant was obviously closed he would not be staying.

Our panic must have been noticeable, as he offered us a ride back to the town of Douglas, where our hotel was located. Leaping into his car with profound gratitude, we were struck again by the thoughtfulness we had continued to encounter throughout the trip. We remember the golf, but, more importantly, we recall the people and their compassion.

BARBARA G. HUBINGER
Danville, CA

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In September ’01, shortly after the tragedy of 9-11, we traveled to Ireland for two weeks and then to the Isle of Man. As U.S. citizens, we were met in both places with kindness, understanding and concern.

When we arrived on the Isle of Man, a game of golf was immediately scheduled. But on the chosen morning, when we arrived at the King Edward Bay Golf Club via taxi, the only person around was the golf pro. After renting clubs to my husband (I don’t play), he told us he was leaving for the day and said, “Just put them in the locker room. I’ll leave it unlocked.”

So off we went, the only two people on the course. It was cold and windy but exhilarating. The course was situated high up in the hills of the central part of the island, and the views were incredible.

After 18 holes, we dragged ourselves back to the clubhouse and returned the rented clubs to the unlocked locker room. Then it dawned on us: we were alone! No phone, no car, not one other person within about 10 miles.

Panic almost set in, but in the distance we could see a car slowly making its way up the hill toward us. The gentleman in the arriving car told us that he was hoping to enjoy lunch, but since the restaurant was obviously closed he would not be staying.

Our panic must have been noticeable, as he offered us a ride back to the town of Douglas, where our hotel was located. Leaping into his car with profound gratitude, we were struck again by the thoughtfulness we had continued to encounter throughout the trip. We remember the golf, but, more importantly, we recall the people and their compassion.

BARBARA G. HUBINGER
Danville, CA