Break from the pack

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In Dan Gifford’s article on South Africa (Oct. ’03, pg. 29), I was interested to read about the radios used by tour guides on safaris. We were shocked when we learned, ourselves, that this was an accepted routine on all safaris.

We took an excellent trip in Kenya offered by Micato Safaris (New York, NY; phone 800/642-2861 or visit www.micato.com) in April 2000. Throughout the week, Abercrombie & Kent’s vehicles were alongside ours, “chasing” to get to the animals spotted by their scouts as well as by ours. What a joke to see six to eight vehicles surrounding the “wildlife” with the tourists clicking their cameras.

Next time, we’ll ask our guide to turn off his radio and explore the beautiful countryside quietly, as Mr. Gifford did.

KATHY WHEALE
Greenville, SC

Please login or subscribe to ITN to read the entire post.

In Dan Gifford’s article on South Africa (Oct. ’03, pg. 29), I was interested to read about the radios used by tour guides on safaris. We were shocked when we learned, ourselves, that this was an accepted routine on all safaris.

We took an excellent trip in Kenya offered by Micato Safaris (New York, NY; phone 800/642-2861 or visit www.micato.com) in April 2000. Throughout the week, Abercrombie & Kent’s vehicles were alongside ours, “chasing” to get to the animals spotted by their scouts as well as by ours. What a joke to see six to eight vehicles surrounding the “wildlife” with the tourists clicking their cameras.

Next time, we’ll ask our guide to turn off his radio and explore the beautiful countryside quietly, as Mr. Gifford did.

KATHY WHEALE
Greenville, SC